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IanBarber Profile
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Epson Advanced Black and White Driver Experiment


I have conducted a small experiment whereby I sent two step-wedge files to the Epson ABW driver.

One file was in proPhotoRGB and the other in Adobe RGB 1998. With the x-rite color munki I then measured each of the segments of the step-wedge and referenced the values against the original image on the computer.

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Norman2 Profile
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Re: Epson Advanced Black and White Driver Experiment


This is a very interesting subject and reminds me of some experiments I saw under the heading of Psychology of Colour. I also set up an experiment, digitally, and offered it to any one who wanted to try it it that time.

If one tried to do the tests you have done purely visually then, in all probability, whatever paper you used white will always be white.

Norman
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Re: Epson Advanced Black and White Driver Experiment


I found it interesting that like you say Norman, visually the paper does look white to our eyes but as you start to measure the actual values of it do you realise that infact its not as pure as we believe.

Regards paper white, i think its important to realise this when editing images and choosing your output paper.

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Re: Epson Advanced Black and White Driver Experiment


What you appear to be suggesting, Ian, is that if the intention is to produce the final image as a print then it might be a good idea to set the monitor to suit the substrate that will be used. After all, in the darkroom days, the test strips were always done on the paper to be used for the final print.

Do we worry too much about the light in which the print will be viewed? Assuming that the ambient light is relatively neutral, 'white' will always appear 'white'. The eye/brain link does not work like the digital measuring instruments because the human observer has an expectation whereas the digital observer does not.

Norman
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Re: Epson Advanced Black and White Driver Experiment


quote:

Norman2 wrote:

Do we worry too much about the light in which the print will be viewed? Assuming that the ambient light is relatively neutral, 'white' will always appear 'white'. The eye/brain link does not work like the digital measuring instruments because the human observer has an expectation whereas the digital observer does not.

Norman



I accept the eye / brain linkage and we probably don't even give the viewing light a second thought, we simply print frame and plonk it on a wall. But having said that, I think is important that we should be aware of the differences in paper white especially if we are pushing tonal values up to around RGB 255


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Norman2 Profile
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Re: Epson Advanced Black and White Driver Experiment


Ian, I think we are both really saying the same thing. If we ignore the ambient light question because we have no control over where the print will be displayed then we are left to concentrate on the effects which the substrate will have on the finished image.

I suggest there are three factors to consider, the texture of the substrate, the colour of the substrate and its finish. As I wrote earlier, in the darkroom, the tests to find the exposure and developing conditions were carried out on the substrate which was to be used for the final image. Thus, to bring the digital method into line it could be desirable that the image, as viewed on the monitor, will look the same as it will when printed.

Perhaps you, as the professional can answer the question, is it possible to set a monitor so that the image displayed is the same as that produced when it is printed? Could there be a collection of prepared settings from which the appropriate setting is selected and the image prepared using it prior to sending it to the printer?

I hope this helps rather than hinders the research that you are conducting.

Norman
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Re: Epson Advanced Black and White Driver Experiment


The problems with screen to print match is one of the biggest issues we are faces with because the image on the screen is usually lit from behind and the print is not.

Other areas we have to be aware of are things like:

Monitor screen calibration
Printer Profiles
Printer capable gamut size
Screen Gamut size

This is why in my opinion having a colour managed workflow is vital in any workflow even if only working in black and white.

Start by calibrating the monitor with a hardware device and setting the luminance to around 110 - 120 max. The making sure you have good quality ICC paper profiles or a sound understanding of the ABW driver if using this route.

Understanding the difference between working in ProPhoto or Adobe RGB is also an important factor to add to the mix because of what tones will be printed and what tones will not be printed dues to the size of the colour space container.

In short, I cannot see a quick fix that will guarantee a perfect print to screen match without at least having some form of a controlled setup


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